• Adey, P. (2003). Secured and sorted mobilities: Examples from the airport. Surveillance & Society, 1(4), 501–519.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Amelina, A.
    (2021). After the reflexive turn in migration studies: Towards the doing migration approach. Population, Space and Place, 27(1),
    e2368. https://doi.org/10.1002/psp.2368.

  • Anderson, B. (2019). New directions in migration studies: Towards methodological de-nationalism. Comparative Migration Studies, 7(36), 1–13. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40878-019-0140-8

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Anthias, F. (2012). Transnational mobilities, migration research and intersectionality’. Nordic Journal of Migration Research, 2(2), 102–110.

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Appadurai, A. (1999). Global ethnoscapes: Notes and queries for a transnational anthropology. In S. Vertovec & R. Cohen (Eds.), Migration, diasporas and transnationalism (pp. 463–483). Edward Elgar.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Bal, E. W., Sinha-Kerkhoff, K., & Tripathy, R. (2017). Unequal mobility regimes of Indian gated communities: Converging regional, national and transnational migration flows in Indian metropolitan cities. New Diversities, 19(3), 13–27.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Baldacchino, G. (2018). Connectivity, mobility and island life: parallel narratives from Malta and Lesvos. Symposia Melitensia, 14, 7–17.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Beck-Gernsheim, E. (2011). The marriage route to migration: Of border artistes, transnational matchmaking and imported spouses. Nordic Journal of Migration Research, 1(2), 60–68. https://doi.org/10.2478/v10202-011-0008-y

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Bernardie-Tahir, N., & Schmoll, C. (2014). Opening up the island: A ‘counter-islandness’ approach to migration in Malta. Island Studies Journal, 9(1), 43–56.

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Bhambra, G. K. (2014). Connected sociologies. Bloomsbury Academic.

    Book 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Blanchard, M. (2017). Observing the multiple intersections of mobilities through ‘return migration’ in the Alps. New Diversities, 19(3), 75–87.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Boyd, M. (1989). Family and personal networks in international migration: Recent developments and new agendas. The International Migration Review, 23(3), 638–670.

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Boyd, M., & Nowak, J. (2013). Social networks and international migration. In M. Martiniello & J. Rath (Eds.), An introduction to international migration studies: European perspectives (pp. 80–105). Amsterdam University Press.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Brambilla, C. (2015). Exploring the critical potential of the borderscapes concept. Geopolitics, 20(1), 14–34.

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Bruzelius, C., & Shutes, I. (2022). Towards an understanding of mobility in social policy research. Global Social Policy. https://doi.org/10.1177/14680181221085477

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Çaǧlar, A., & Glick Schiller, N. (2018). Migrants and city-making: Dispossession, displacement, and urban regeneration. Duke University Press.

    Book 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Camenisch, A., & Müller, S. (2017). From (E)Migration to mobile lifestyles: Ethnographic and conceptual reflections about mobilities and migration. New Diversities, 19(3), 44–57.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Carling, J. (2008). The human dynamics of migrant transnationalism. Ethnic and Racial Studies, 31(8), 1452–1477. https://doi.org/10.1080/01419870701719097

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Chavel, S. (2014). De la migration à la mobil té : Comment aller au-delà du nationalisme méthodologi que? Raisons Politiques, 54(2), 53–66.

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Charmillot, E., & Dahinden, J. (2021). Mobilities, locality and place-making: Understanding categories of (non-)membership in a peripheral valley. Mobilities, 0(0), 1–16. https://doi.org/10.1080/17450101.2021.1971054.

  • Cingolani, P. (2017). Transitions to adulthood in Romania: A diachronic and intergenerational approach to mobility regimes. New Diversities, 19(3), 59–74.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Crenshaw, K. (1994). Mapping the margins: Intersectionality, identity politics, and violence against women of colour. In M. A. Fineman & R. Mykitiuk (Eds.), The public nature of private violence (pp. 92–118). Routledge.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Cresswell, T. (2006). On the move: Mobility in the modern Western world. Routledge.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Cresswell, T. (2010). Towards a politics of mobility. Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, 28(1), 17–31. https://doi.org/10.1068/d11407

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Cresswell, T., & Merriman, P. (2010). Introduction: Geographies of mobility—practices, spaces, subjects. In T. Cresswell & P. Merriman (Eds.), Geographies of mobilities: Practices, spaces, subjects (pp. 1–18). Taylor & Francis Ltd.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Danaj, A. (2016). Analysing narratives of migrant women in post 1991 Albania: Migration as a gendered process. Dissertation (unpublished). University of Neuchâtel.

  • Dahinden, J. (2010). Cabaret dancers: “Settle down in order to stay mobile?” Bridging theoretical orientations within transnational migration studies. Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State & Society, 17(3), 323–348.

  • Dahinden, J. (2016). A plea for the ‘de-migranticization’ of research on migration and integration. Ethnic and Racial Studies, 39(13), 2207–2225.

  • De Genova, N. (2017). Introduction: The borders of ‘Europe’ and the European question. In N. De Genova (Ed.), The borders of ‘Europe’: Autonomy of migration, tactics of bordering (pp. 1–35). Duke University Press.

    Chapter 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Ehrenreich, B. (2003). Global woman: Nannies, maids and sex workers in the new economy. Granta Books.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Elliot, A., Norum, R., & Salazar, N. B. (Eds.). (2017). Methodologies of mobility: Ethnography and experiment. Berghahn Books.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Erel, U., Murji, K., & Nahaboo, Z. (2016). Understanding the contemporary race–migration nexus. Ethnic and Racial Studies, 39(8), 1339–1360. https://doi.org/10.1080/01419870.2016.1161808

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Faist, T. (2013). The mobility turn: A new paradigm for the social sciences? Ethnic and Racial Studies, 36(11), 1637–1646.

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Favell, A. (2008). Eurostars and Eurocities: Free movement and mobility in an integrating Europe. Blackwell Publishing.

    Book 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Favell, A. (2014). Immigration, integration and mobility: New agendas in migration studies: Essays 1998–2014. ECPR Press.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Favell, A. (2022). The integration nation. Immigration and colonial power in liberal democracies. Polity Press.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Fawcett, J. T. (1989). Networks, linkages, and migration systems. International Migration Review, 23(3), 671–680. https://doi.org/10.1177/019791838902300314

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Glick Schiller, N., Çaglar, A., & Guldbrandsen, T. C. (2006). Beyond the ethnic lens: Locality, globality, and born-again incorporation. American Ethnologist, 33(4), 612–633. https://doi.org/10.1525/ae.2006.33.4.612

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Glick Schiller, N., & Salazar, N. B. (2013). Regimes of mobility across the globe. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 39(2), 183–200.

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Groes, C., & Fernandez, N. T. (2018). Introduction: Intimate mobilities and mobile intimacies. In N. T. Fernandez & C. Groes (Eds.), Intimate mobilities: Sexual economies, marriage and migration in a disparate world (pp. 1–17). Berghahn Books.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Grosfoguel, R., Oso, L., & Christou, A. (2015). ‘Racism’, intersectionality and migration studies: Framing some theoretical reflections. Identities, 22(6), 635–652. https://doi.org/10.1080/1070289X.2014.950974

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Gutiérrez Rodríguez, E. (2021). Entangled Migrations. The Coloniality of Migration and Creolizing Conviviality. Mecila Working Paper Series 35. Retrieved July 21, from https://www.iai.spk-berlin.de/fileadmin/dokumentenbibliothek/Veroeffentlichungen/Mecila_Working_Papers/WP_35_Guti%C3%A9rrez_Rodr%C3%ADguez_Online.pdf

  • Gutiérrez Rodríguez, E. (2018). The coloniality of migration and the ‘Refugee Crisis’: On the asylum-migration nexus, the transatlantic white European settler colonialism-migration and racial capitalism. Refuge, 34(1), 16–28.

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Hannam, K., Sheller, M., & Urry, J. (2006). Editorial: Mobilities, immobilities and moorings. Mobilities, 1(1), 1–22. https://doi.org/10.1080/17450100500489189

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Heil, T., Priori, A., Riccio, B., & Schwarz, I. (2017). Mobilities: Migratory experiences ethnographically connected—an introduction. New Diversities, 19(3), 1–12.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Hoffmeyer-Zlotnik, P. (2020). Between flows and places: Conceptualizing the migration-mobility nexus. nccr Working Paper, 25. https://nccr-onthemove.ch/publications/between-flows-and-places-conceptualizing-the-migration-mobility-nexus/

  • Hui, A. (2016). The boundaries of interdisciplinary fields: Temporalities shaping the past and future of dialogue between migration and mobilities research. Mobilities, 11(1), 66–82. https://doi.org/10.1080/17450101.2015.1097033

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Kalir, B. (2013). Moving subjects, stagnant paradigms: Can the “mobilities paradigm” transcend methodological nationalism? Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 39(2), 311–327.

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • King, R., & Skeldon, R. (2010). ‘Mind the gap!’ Integrating approaches to internal and international migration. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 36(10), 1619–1646.

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Kunz, S. (2020). Expatriate, migrant? The social life of migration categories and the polyvalent mobility of race. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 46(11), 2145–2162. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369183X.2019.1584525

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Levitt, P., & Jaworsky, B. N. (2007). Transnational migration studies: Past developments and future trends. Annual Review of Sociology, 33(1), 129–156. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.soc.33.040406.131816

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • MacDonald, J. S., & MacDonald, L. D. (1964). Chain migration, ethnic neighborhood formation and social networks. The Milbank Memorial Fund Quarterly, 42(1), 82–97. https://doi.org/10.2307/3348581

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Malkki, L. (1992). National geographic: The rooting of peoples and the territorialization of national identity among scholars and refugees. Cultural Anthropology, 7(1), 24–44.

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Marcus, G. E. (1995). Ethnography in/of the world system: The emergence of multi-sited ethnography. Annual Review of Anthropology, 24, 95–117.

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Massey, D. (2005). For space. SAGE Publications Ltd.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Mayblin, L., & Turner, J. (2021). Migration studies and colonialism. Polity.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Menet, J. (2020). Entangled mobilities in the transnational salsa circuit: The esperanto of the body, gender and ethnicity. Routledge.

    Book 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Milbourne, P., & Kitchen, L. (2014). Rural mobilities: Connecting movement and fixity in rural places. Journal of Rural Studies, 34, 326–336. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jrurstud.2014.01.004

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Mohanty, C. T. (1984). Under Western eyes: Feminist scholarship and colonial discourses. Boundary, 12(3), 333–358. https://doi.org/10.2307/302821

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Moret, J. (2018). European Somalis’ post-migration movements: Mobility capital and the transnationalisation of resources. IMISCOE Research Series. Springer International Publishing. www.springer.com/gp/book/9783319956596.

  • Moret, J. (2016). Cross-border mobility, transnationality and ethnicity as resources: European Somalis’ post-migration mobility practices. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 42(9), 1455–1472. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369183X.2015.1123089

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Morokvasic, M., Münst, A. S., & Metz-Göckel, S., et al. (2008). Gendered mobilities in an enlarged Europe. In S. Metz-Göckel, M. Morokvasic, A. S. Münst, K. Slany, C. Finotelli, L. Banfi, & A. Akalin (Eds.), Migration and mobility in an enlarged Europe: A gender perspective (pp. 9–26). Barbara Budrich.

    Chapter 

    Google Scholar
     

  • nccr – on the move (2019). The Migration-Mobility Nexus, Neuchâtel. Retrieved July 21, from https://nccr-onthemove.ch/about-us/the-migration-mobility-nexus/

  • Nieswand, B., & Drotbohm, H. (2014). Einleitung: Die reflexive wende in der migrationsforschung. In B. Nieswand & H. Drotbohm (Eds.), Kultur, gesellschaft, migration: Die reflexive Wende in der migrationsforschung (pp. 1–37). Springer Fachmedien. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-658-03626-3_1

    Chapter 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Palmary, I. (2021). Gender, sexuality and migration: Global questions and their colonial legacies. In C. Mora & N. Piper (Eds.), The Palgrave handbook of gender and migration (pp. 73–87). Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-63347-9

    Chapter 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Parreñas, R. S. (2001). Servants of globalization: Women, migration, and domestic work. Ateneo de Manila University Press.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Quijano, A. (2000). Coloniality of power and eurocentrism in Latin America. International Sociology, 15(2), 215–232. https://doi.org/10.1177/0268580900015002005

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Raghuram, P. (2021). Democratizing, stretching, entangling, transversing: Four moves for reshaping migration categories. Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies, 19(1), 9–24. https://doi.org/10.1080/15562948.2020.1837325

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Rajaram, P. K. (2018). Refugees as surplus population: Race, migration and capitalist value regimes. New Political Economy, 23(5), 627–639. https://doi.org/10.1080/13563467.2017.1417372

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Römhild, R. (2014). Diversität?! Postethnische Perspektiven für eine reflexive migrationsforschung. In B. Nieswand & H. Drotbohm (Eds.), Kultur, Gesellschaft, migration: Die reflexive wende in der migrationsforschung (pp. 255–270). Wiesbaden: Springer Fachmedien. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-658-03626-3_1

    Chapter 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Rosenthal, G. (2011). Interpretative Sozialforschung. Eine Einführung. Juventa-Verlag.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Sager, A. (2020). Against Borders: Why the World Needs Free Movement of People. Off the Fence. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Salazar, N. B. (2016). Conceptual notes on the freedom of movement and bounded mobilities. In M. Gutekunst, A. Hackl, S. Leoncini, J. S. Schwarz, & I. Götz (Eds.), Bounded mobilities: Ethnographic perspectives on social hierarchies and global inequalities (pp. 283–289). Transcript.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Salazar, N. B. (2020). Labour migration and tourism mobilities: Time to bring sustainability into the debate. Tourism Geographies. https://doi.org/10.1080/14616688.2020.1801827

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Schapendonk, J. (2020). Finding ways through Eurospace: West African movers re-viewing Europe from the inside. Berghahn Books.

    Book 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Schapendonk, J., & Steel, G. (2014). Following migrant trajectories: The im/mobility of Sub-Saharan Africans en route to the European Union. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 104(2), 262–270.

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Schaer, M., Jacot, C., & Dahinden, J. (2021). Transnational mobility networks and academic social capital among early-career academics: Beyond common-sense assumptions. Global Networks, 21(3), 585–607. https://doi.org/10.1111/glob.12304.

  • Schapendonk, J., Bolay, M., & Dahinden, J. (2021). The conceptual limits of the ‘migration journey’. De-exceptionalising mobility in the context of West African trajectories. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 47(14), 3243–3259. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369183X.2020.1804191.

  • Scheel, S. (2017). Appropriating mobility and bordering Europe through romantic love: Unearthing the intricate intertwinement of border regimes and migratory practices. Migration Studies, 5(3), 389–408. https://doi.org/10.1093/migration/mnx047

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Scheel, S., & Gutekunst, M. (2019). Studying marriage migration to Europe from below: Informal practices of government, border struggles and multiple entanglements. Gender, Place & Culture, 26(6), 847–867. https://doi.org/10.1080/0966369X.2018.1489375

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Schiller, G. N., Basch, L., & SzantonBlanc, C. (1992). Transnationalism: A new analytic framework for understanding migration. In N. G. Schiller, L. Basch, & C. SzantonBlanc (Eds.), Towards a transnational perspective on migration: Race, class, ethnicity and nationalism reconsidered (pp. 1–24). New York Academy Series.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Schinkel, W. (2018). Against ‘immigrant integration’: For an end to neocolonial knowledge production. Comparative Migration Studies, 6(1), 1–17. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40878-018-0095-1

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Schmoll, C. (2005). Pratiques spatiales transnationales et stratégies de mobilité des commerçantes tunisiennes. Revue Européenne Des Migrations Internationales, 21(1), 131–154. https://doi.org/10.4000/remi.2352

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Schuster, L. (2005). The continuing mobility of migrants in Italy: Shifting between places and statuses. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 31(4), 757–774.

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Sheller, M., & Urry, J. (2006). The new mobilities paradigm. Environment and Planning A, 38(2), 207–226.

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Spivak, G. C. (1988). Can the subaltern speak? In L. Grossberg & C. Nelson (Eds.), Marxism and the interpretation of culture (pp. 271–316). University of Illinois Press.

    Chapter 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Stoler, A. L. (2011). Colonial aphasia: Race and disabled histories in France. Public Culture, 23(1), 121–156. https://doi.org/10.1215/08992363-2010-018

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Tarrius, A. (1993). Territoires circulatoires et espaces urbains: Différentiation des groupes migrants. Les Annales De La Recherche Urbaine, 59(1), 51–60. https://doi.org/10.3406/aru.1993.1727

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Tarrius, A. (2002). La Mondialisation par le bas: Les Nouveaux Nomades de l’économie souterraine. Balland.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Tarrius, A. (2010). Territoires circulatoires et étapes urbaines des transmigrant(e)s. Regards Croisés Sur L’economie, 2(8), 63–70.

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Tudor, A. (2018). Cross-fadings of racialisation and migratisation: The postcolonial turn in Western European gender and migration studies. Gender, Place & Culture, 25(7), 1057–1072. https://doi.org/10.1080/0966369X.2018.1441141

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Urry, J. (2007). Mobilities. Polity Press.


    Google Scholar
     

  • Wimmer, A. (2009). Herder’s heritage and the boundary-making approach: Studying ethnicity in immigrant societies. Sociological Theory, 27(3), 244–270.

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Wimmer, A., & Glick Schiller, N. (2002). Methodological nationalism and beyond: Nation-state building, migration and the social sciences. Global Networks, 2(4), 301–334.

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • Wyss, A. (forthcoming). Navigating the European migration regime. Male migrants, interrupted journeys and precarious lives. Bristol University Press.

  • Wyss, A. (2019). Stuck in Mobility? The interrupted journeys of migrants with precarious legal status in EUrope. Journal of Immigrant and Refugee Studies, 17(1), 77–93. https://doi.org/10.1080/15562948.2018.1514091.

  • Rights and permissions

    Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

    Disclaimer:

    This article is autogenerated using RSS feeds and has not been created or edited by OA JF.

    Click here for Source link (https://www.springeropen.com/)